Treatments for Diabetes

Diabetes treatment begins with a rule that all people, diabetes stricken or not, should live by: maintain a healthy lifestyle. Eat healthily, exercise regularly and lose weight if necessary. An active thin person who eats healthily has a much lower chance of developing diabetes than a person who is lethargic and overweight and eats unhealthy foods. More important than any prescription drug or insulin injection, staying in shape and being an overall healthy person is the first line of defense against diabetes.

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, then you may be interested in taking part in one of our diabetes clinical trials in DeLand, FL.

In curing diabetes medicinally, treatments lower elevated glucose in the body and sustain a healthy blood sugar level concurrently. A daily dose of aspirin may be added to the prescription drug and insulin injection mix. Keeping blood pressure and cholesterol at healthy levels are also keys to treating diabetes. Depending on the type of diabetes a person has, his overall health, the disease severity and the patient’s treatment preferences, a specific regimen will be designed by the patient’s doctor for appropriate and tailor-made diabetes treatment.

Regardless of the type of diabetes a person has, they will be advised to follow the diabetes diet. This diet is low in sugar, fat, calories and cholesterol intake. Diabetes patients already have difficulty processing the glucose it naturally has even before ingesting food. Diet and exercise prove successful in enabling diabetic people to recover the natural ability to maintain healthy levels of blood sugar.

There are two main types of diabetes, each with its own treatment necessities.

Type I Diabetes

Type I diabetes (juvenile diabetes; insulin-dependent diabetes) is caused by the termination of insulin production by the beta cells of the pancreas. This occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells as a result of malfunctioning. The body relies upon insulin to process and digest glucose. Once the beta cells stop producing insulin, glucose builds up in the blood stream and causes diabetes. Type I diabetes is generally diagnosed in children, teenagers and young adults. It is treated with the following:

  • Insulin injections
  • Diabetic diet
  • Exercise
  • Maintenance of healthy body weight

Type II Diabetes

Type II diabetes (adult-onset diabetes; noninsulin-dependent diabetes) develops when the body’s liver cells, fat and muscles do not use insulin appropriately and use too much of it at once. The pancreas is forced to work progressively harder to produce adequate insulin to keep up with the body’s increased insulin demand. Eventually, the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin after a meal’s worth of food enters the body and the blood stream is inundated with glucose. Without enough insulin to process the glucose, the glucose builds up in the blood stream. Medication may be needed to enable the pancreas to generate more insulin, decrease the liver’s glucose productivity, decrease carbohydrate absorption from the intestine and slow the rate at which the stomach empties its contents (in order to slow the rate at which the small intestine absorbs and digests carbohydrates), and increase the sensitivity of bodily cells to insulin. Type II diabetes is treated with the following:

  • Diabetic diet
  • Exercise
  • Maintenance of healthy body weight
  • Prescription oral medications
  • Insulin injections

Pregnant and breastfeeding women are generally not prescribed oral medications for diabetes treatment. If you are considering becoming pregnant, speak with your health care provider so that your treatment regimen could be appropriately modified, if necessary, so that there is no risk of fetal harm. Before exercising and adopting the diabetic diet, speak with your doctor.

Every case of diabetes is unique, and therefore each treatment plan is specially designed for each patient. Talk with your doctor about developing a suitable treatment program for you. Begin with the foundation of diet, exercise and weight management and fortify your treatment with regular doctor visits and medications if necessary. Diabetes is treatable, so take action and cure your diabetes.

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